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BIOCHEMICAL COMPONENTS IN RELATION TO PESTS INCIDENCE OF PIGEONPEA SPOTTED POD BORER (MARUCA VITRATA) AND BLISTER BEETLE (MYLABRIS SPP.)

Article Id: ARCC2423 | Page : 87 - 93
Citation :- BIOCHEMICAL COMPONENTS IN RELATION TO PESTS INCIDENCE OF PIGEONPEA SPOTTED POD BORER (MARUCA VITRATA) AND BLISTER BEETLE (MYLABRIS SPP.).Legume Research.2008.(31):87 - 93
P. Anantharaju and A.R. Muthiah
Address : Centre for Plant Breeding and Genetics, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore – 641 003, India.

Abstract

The present study was carried out in pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.] to identify the resistant sources for spotted pod borer and blister beetle. The study of spotted pod borer resistance or tolerance was carried out in open field conditions without spraying any insecticide. The screening was done on seven parents and twelve F1’s hybrids based on biochemical components. Considering the resistance to spotted pod borer and blister beetle, under unsprayed field conditions, the highest grain yield has been recorded by LRG 41 with lowest yield loss. The hybrid LRG 41 x ICPL 87119 registered the highest yield coupled with lowest yield loss. Hence the parent LRG 41 and the cross LRG 41 x ICPL 87119 are potential sources for future breeding programs. Biochemical basis of resistance may be due to low amount of total free amino acid, crude protein content and high amount of total phenolics in the pigeonpea genotypes against spotted pod borer and blister beetle.

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