Molecular characterisation of CGMS, maintainer and inbred lines and diversity analysis in pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.] 

DOI: 10.18805/lr.v38i6.6716    | Article Id: LR-3155 | Page : 734-741
Citation :- Molecular characterisation of CGMS, maintainer and inbred lines and diversity analysis in pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.] .Legume Research-An International Journal.2015.(38):734-741

K. Indira Petchiammal*, A.R. Muthiah and P. Jayamani

indirakombaiah.pbg@gmail.com
Address :

Department of Pulses, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore-641 003, India.

Abstract

The present study was initiated with forty microsatellite markers for studying the molecular genetic diversity in 28 pigeonpea genotypes (6 CGMS lines of A1, A2 and A4 sources, their maintainer lines and 16 inbred lines) utilised as the parental material for the synthesis of F1 hybrids. The level of polymorphism was too low and only 45 per cent markers were polymorphic. A total of 65 alleles were produced and the number of alleles produced ranged from two to six.  The mean PIC value of 40 SSR primers was 0.147 and the primer CcM2977 produced the highest PIC value of 0.787 followed by CcM1770 (0.565). The primers viz., CcM0039 and CcM2463 were polymorphic between CGMS and inbred lines and the primer CcM2977 was polymorphic among the different sources of CGMS lines. The UPGMA clustering and Neighbour-joining analyses grouped all the CGMS lines and respective maintainer lines in a single cluster and the inbred lines as two separate clusters. Among the inbred lines ICPL 11966, ICPL11947 and ICPL11950 were distinctly grouped in one cluster and other 13 inbred lines were clustered separately. Polymorphic markers viz.,CcM2977 and CcM1770 were used to confirm the hybrids of the crosses viz.,    ICPA 2043 x LRG 41 and ICPA 2043 x IC 33725. The present study revealed that SSR markers are highly informative for exploiting the molecular diversity prevailing among the parental lines and could be utilized for further pigeonpea improvement at genomic level.

Keywords

Cajanus cajan CGMS lines Maintainer lines Microsatellite Markers Molecular Diversity.

References

  1. Bohra, A., Dubey, A., Saxena R.K., Penmetsa R.V., Poornima K.N., Kumar N., Farmer A.D., Srivani G., Upadhyaya H.D., Gothalwal R., Ramesh S., Singh D., Saxena K.B., Kishor P.B.K., Singh N.K., Town C.D., May G.D., Cook D.R. and Varshney R.K. (2011). Analysis of BAC-end sequences (BESs) and development of BES-SSR markers for genetic mapping and hybrid purity assessment in pigeonpea (Cajanus spp.). BMC Plant Biology. 11:56.1-15.
  2. Botstein, D., White R.L., Skolnick M. and Davis R.W. (1980). Construction of a genetic linkage map in man using restriction fragment length polymorphisms. Am.J.Hum.Genet. 32: 314-331.
  3. Datta J., Lal N., Kaashyap M. and Gupta P.P. (2009). Efficiency of Three PCR based marker Systems for detecting DNA Polymorphism in Cicer arietinum (L.) and Cajanus cajan (L.)Millspaugh. Genet. Eng. And Biotech.J. 5: 1-15.
  4. Dutta J., Lal N., Kaashyap M. and Gupta P.P. (2011). Efficiency of Three PCR based marker Systems for detecting DNA Polymorphism in Cicer arietinum (L.) and Cajanus cajan (L.)Millspaugh. Genet. Eng. And Biotech.J. 5: 1-15.
  5. Liu S., Cantrell R.G., McCary J.C. and Sterwart J. (2000). Simple sequence based assessment of genetic diversity in cotton race stock accessions. Crop Sci. 40: 1459-1469.
  6. Mace E.S., Buhariwalla H.K. and Crouch J.H. (2003). A High Throughput DNA Extraction Protocol for Tropical Molecular Breeding Programs. Plant Mol. Biol. Reporter. 21: 459a-459h.
  7. Mallikarjuna N., Saxena K.B. and Jadhav D.R. (2011). Cajanus. In: Kole C (ed). Wild Crop Relatives: Genomic and Breeding Resources, Legume Crops and Forages. P 21-33.
  8. Odeny D.A., Jayashree B., Ferguson M., Hoisington D.A., Crouch and Gebhardt C. (2007). Development, Characterization and Utilization of microsatellite markers in Pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.]. Plant Breeding. 126: 130-137.
  9. Odeny D.A., Jayashree B., Gebhardt C. and Crouch J. (2009). New Microsatellite Markers for Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.). BMC Research Notes. 2: 35.
  10. Perrier X., and Jaqeuemond-Collet J.P. (2005). DARwin- 5.0: Dissimilarity analysis and representation for windows. Equipe Mathematique et Informatique, France.
  11. Saxena, K.B., Kumar R.V. and Rao P.V. (2002). Pigeonpea nutrition and its improvement. In: Quality Improvement in Field Crops. [Basra A. S., Randhawa I.S. (eds)]. Food Products Press, pp. 227-260.
  12. Saxena R.K., Prathima C., Saxena K.B., Hoisinngton D.A., Singh N.K. and Varshney R.K. (2010). Novel SSR markers for polymorphism detection in Pigeonpea (Cajanus spp.). Plant Breeding. 129: 142-148.
  13. Singh S., Singh K.N., Kant R., Mehfooz S. and Dutta S. (2008). Assessment of genetic diversity among Pigeonpea genotypes using SSR markers. Indian J. Genet., 68: 255-260.
  14. Smith J.S.C., Chin E.C.L., Shu H., Smith O.S., Wall S.J., Senior M.L., Mitchell S.E., Kresovich S. and Zeigle J. (1997). An evaluation of the utility of SSR loci as molecular markers in maize (Zea mays L.): comparisions with data from RFLPs and pedigree. Theor. Appl. Genetics. 95: 163-173.
  15. Van der Maesen L.J.G. (1990). Pigeonpea: Origin, history, evolution and taxonomy. In Pigeonpea.
  16. Nene Y.L, Hall S.D., Sheilla V.K. CAB International. Wallingford 15-46. 

Global Footprints