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FLOWER PRODUCTION AND YIELD IN FIVE PHASEOLUS VULGARIS GENOTYPES

Article Id: ARCC3639 | Page : 89 - 95
Citation :- FLOWER PRODUCTION AND YIELD IN FIVE PHASEOLUS VULGARIS GENOTYPES.Legume Research.2006.(29):89 - 95
M.S. Miah, M.A. Hossain and M.S.A. Fakir*
Address : Department of Crop Botany, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh, Bangladesh

Abstract

The experiment was carried out in Mymensingh (24°N 90°E) during 2000–2001 to investigate the magnitude of flower production and floral abscission, and their relationships with yield and yield contributing characters in five French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) genotypes. The results revealed that the number of flowers/plant varied between 23 and 43, and average percentage floral abscission varied between 72 and 85. The pattern of flower production and abscission suggests that variety with greater number of fertile inflorescence with large number of flowers may produce higher yield. Larger and wider pods are related to greater pod yield. Results conclude that there were variations in flower production, percentage floral abscission and yield, and the genotypes with increased number of fertile racemes and reduced abscission may produce greater yield in French bean.

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