Indian Journal of Agricultural Research

  • Chief EditorT. Mohapatra

  • Print ISSN 0367-8245

  • Online ISSN 0976-058X

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Indian Journal of Agricultural Research, volume 43 issue 4 (december 2009) : 307 - 310

EFFECT OF ANTITRANSPIRANTS ON WATER STATUS AND GROWTH PATTERN OF MULBERRY ( MORUS ALBA L) UNDER TWO LEVELS OF IRRIGATION

A.K. Misra, B.K. Das, J.K. Datta1, G.C. De2
1Central Sericultural Research and Training Institute Berhampore-742 101, india
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Cite article:- Misra A.K., Das B.K., Datta1 J.K., De2 G.C. (2024). EFFECT OF ANTITRANSPIRANTS ON WATER STATUS AND GROWTH PATTERN OF MULBERRY ( MORUS ALBA L) UNDER TWO LEVELS OF IRRIGATION. Indian Journal of Agricultural Research. 43(4): 307 - 310. doi: .
An investigation was carried out to study the effect antitranspirants on leaf water
status and growth pattern of mulberry under two levels of irrigation during the year
1999-2001. Leaf moisture content was observed highest in control under normal
irrigated plants while in limited irrigation BX-112 had the maximum followed by
CCC. Control had the lowest moisture content. CCC and BX-112 increased the
relative water content of mulberry leaves at both the irrigation levels. CCC and BX-
112 enhanced total dry matter accumulation particularly in limited irrigation. CCC
application augmented the leaf area index. CCC and BX-112 showed the capacity to
increase CGR and NAR in terms of growth rate and assimilation under low soil
moisture condition.
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