Indian Journal of Agricultural Research

  • Chief EditorT. Mohapatra

  • Print ISSN 0367-8245

  • Online ISSN 0976-058X

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Indian Journal of Agricultural Research, volume 43 issue 4 (december 2009) : 303 - 306

IMPACT OF FOOD PLANT AND WEATHER PARAMETERS ON LONGEVITY OF FEMALE MUGA SILKWORM ANTHERAEA ASSAMA WESTWOOD

R.Ghorai, N.Chaudhuri1, S.K.Senapati*
1Department of Agril. Entomology Uttar Banga Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Pundibari, Cooch Behar-736 165, India
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Cite article:- R.Ghorai, N.Chaudhuri1, S.K.Senapati* (2024). IMPACT OF FOOD PLANT AND WEATHER PARAMETERS ON LONGEVITY OF FEMALE MUGA SILKWORM ANTHERAEA ASSAMA WESTWOOD. Indian Journal of Agricultural Research. 43(4): 303 - 306. doi: .
Studies on impact of food plant and weather parameters on longevity of female
muga silkworm Antheraea assama under terai climatic conditions of West Bengal,
India revealed that the pre-oviposition period was higher on soalu (Litsea polyantha
Juss.) (1.60 days) than som (Machilus bombycina King) (1.57 days). The higher preoviposition
period (1.93 days) was recorded during December-February. The oviposition
period was more on som (3.79 days) than soalu (3.36 days). The maximum (4.35
days) and minimum (2.69 days) mean oviposition period were recorded in September-
October and March-April. The post-oviposition period was longest (1.11 days) on
soalu than som (0.85 days). It was longest in September-October (1.28 days) and
shortest in March-April (0.82 dyas). The adult from som fed stock lived long (6.15
days) as compared to that of soalu fed stock (6.09 days). The adult longevity was
longest in September-October (6.97 days) and shortest in March-April (4.94 days).
The period of pre-oviposition, oviposition, post-oviposition and adult longevity varied
over food plants and seasons due to variation in climatic conditions.
  1. Biswas, I. et al., (2003). Absts. Nat. Sym. Assessment and Management of Bioresources, University of North Bengal, May 28-30, p.19.
  2. Singh, K. C. and Singh, N. I. (1998). Indian J. Seric., 37(2): 89-100.
  3. Thangarvelu, K. et al., (1992). In: Proc. Nat. Symp. On Growth and Developmental and Control Technology of Insect Pest (Goel, S.C. ed) Muzaffarnagar, Oct 2-4, 1991, p. 90-94.
  4. Thangavelu, K and Baishya, B.K. (1985). Indian Silk, p. 17-23.
  5. Thangavelu, K. et al., (1988). Hand Book of Muga Culture, Central Silk Board, Bangalore.

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