Evaluation of out-of-season estrus induction protocols in progesterone-primed mix-breed dairy goats using eCG, GnRH and E2

DOI: 10.18805/ijar.v0iOF.9116    | Article Id: B-689 | Page : 711-715
Citation :- Evaluation of out-of-season estrus induction protocols in progesterone-primed mix-breed dairy goats using eCG, GnRH and E2 .Indian Journal Of Animal Research.2019.(53):711-715

Evaristo Carrillo, César A. Meza-Herrera, Juan R. Luna-Orozco, Ramón A. Delgado-Gonzales, Leticia R. Gaytan Aleman, Oscar Ángel-Garcia, Francisco G . Véliz and Viridiana Contreras-Villarreal

dra.viridianac@icloud.com
Address :

Universidad Autónoma Agraria Antonio Narro, Departamento de Ciencias Médico Veterinarias, Torreón, Coahuila, México

Submitted Date : 11-01-2017
Accepted Date : 9-06-2017

Abstract

Different out-of-season estrus induction protocols were evaluated using a single progesterone (P4) priming 24h prior the use of eCG, GnRH or E2. Adult anestrus mix-breed dairy goats (n=32) were P4-primed (20 mg i.m.) and randomly assigned (n=8) to:  a). E2: 1mg i.m. estradiol+0.2ml cloprostenol 24h later, b). E2+GnRH: E2+2.5ml GnRH 24h later, c). E2+eCG, E2+100 IU i.m. eCG 24h later, and d). eCG, 250IU i.m. eCG . Response variables considered the percentages of estrus (ES%, detected by sexually active males), ovulation (OV%), and pregnancy (PR%, diagnosed 45d after estrus detection). All treatments achieved high ES% (>87%) and OV% (>50%), yet, E2+GnRH reached 88% of OV% and PR%. E2 alone had the lowest PR% (p<0.05; 12.5%) and the highest interval from estrus to ovulation. The largest PR% (p<0.05; 81.5%, average) were observed in E2+GnRH and E2+eCG. Results indicate the feasibility of a simple synchronization protocol based in a single i.m. progesterone-priming plus E2+GnRH.

Keywords

Anestrous season Estrus percentage Exogenous hormones Ovulation induction Ovulation percentage

References

  1. Alvarado-Espino A.S., Meza-Herrera, C.A. Carrillo, E., Gonzalez-Alvarez, V.H., Guillen-Muñoz, et al. (2016). Reproductive outcomes of Alpine goats primed with progesterone and treated with human chorionic gonadotropin during the anestrus-to-estrus transi    tion season. Anim Reprod Sci 167: 133-138.
  2. Contreras-Villarreal V., Meza-Herrera, C.A., Rivas-Muñoz, R., Angel-Garcia, O., Luna-Orozco, J.R., Carrillo, E., Mellado M., and Veliz F.G. (2016). Reproductive performance of seasonally anovular mixed-bred dairy goats induced to ovulate with a combination of progesterone and eCG or estradiol. Anim. Sci. J. DOI: 10.1111/asj.12493. In press.
  3. Drion P.V., Furtoss, V., Baril, G., Manfredi, E., Bouvier, F., Pougnard, J.L., Bernelas, D., Caugnon,et al., (2001). Four years of induction/    synchronization of estrus in dairy goats: effect on the evolution of eCG binding rate in relation with the parameters of reproduc    tion. Reprod Nutr Dev 41: 401-412.
  4. FASS. (2010). Guide for the care and use of agricultural animals in agricultural research and teaching. 3rd ed, FASS, Savoy, IL, USA.
  5. Fatet A., Pellicer-Rubio M.T., and Leboeuf B. (2011). Reproductive cycle of goats. Anim Reprod Sci 124: 211-219.
  6. Gonzalez-Bulnes A., Meza-Herrera, C.A., Rekik, M., Ben Salem H., and Kridli. R.T. (2011). Limiting factors and strategies for improv    ing reproductive outputs of small ruminants reared in semi-arid environments. In: Degenovine KM, editor. Semi-arid environ    ments: Agriculture, water supply and vegetation. Nova Science Publishers, Inc. New York, p. 41-62. 
  7. Luna-Orozco J.R., Guillen-Muñoz, J.M., de Santiago-Miramontes, M.A., Garcia, J.E. et al., (2012). Influence of sexually inactive bucks subjected to long photoperiod or testosterone on induction of estrus in anovulatory goats. Trop Anim Health Prod 44: 71-75.
  8. Matthews J. (1999). Diseases of the Goat, second ed. Blackwell Science, Oxford, United Kingdom.
  9. Menchaca A. and Rubianes E. (2004). New treatments associated with timed artificial insemination in small ruminants. Reprod Fert Dev 16: 403–413.
  10. Menchaca A. and Rubianes E. (2007). Pregnancy rate obtained with short-term protocol for timed artificial insemination in goats. Reprod Dom Anim 42: 590-593.
  11. Motlomelo K., Greyling J., and Schwalbach L. (2002). Synchronization of estrus in goats: the use of different progestagen treatments. Small Rumin Res 45: 45-49.
  12. NAM. (2002). Guide for the care and use of laboratory animals. Co-produced by the National Academy of Medicine-Mexico and the Association for assessment and accreditation of laboratory animal care international. 1st. Edition, Harlan Mexico, DF, Mexico.
  13. Rensis F. and López-Gatius F. (2014). Use of equine chorionic gonadotropin to control reproduction of the dairy cow: A review. Reprod Dom Anim 49: 177–182
  14. Rubianes E. and Menchaca A. (2003). The pattern and manipulation of ovarian follicular growth in goats. Anim Reprod Sci 78: 271-287.
  15. Sato M., Sugino, T., Yoshimura Y., and Isobe N. (2011). Follicular persistence induced by adrenocorticotropic hormone administration in goats. J Reprod Dev 57: 212–216.
  16. Simões J. (2015). Recent advances on synchronization of ovulation in goats, out of season, for a more sustainable production. Asian Pacific J Reprod 4: 157-165.
  17. Tanaka T., Sawai, R., Kumai, R., Kim, S., Kuroiwa T., and Kamomae H. (2007). Does exogenous progesterone and oestradiol treatment from the mid-luteal phase induce follicular cysts in goats? Anim Reprod Sci 97: 257-264. 

Global Footprints