EFFECTS OF CORN GERM OIL SLUDGE (CS) IN BROILER DIET ON PERFORMANCE' AND CARCASS FATTY ACID COMPOSITION OF BREAST MUSCLE

Article Id: ARCC3505 | Page : 11-17
Citation :- EFFECTS OF CORN GERM OIL SLUDGE (CS) IN BROILER DIET ON PERFORMANCE' AND CARCASS FATTY ACID COMPOSITION OF BREAST MUSCLE.Indian Journal Of Animal Research.2000.(34):11-17
Manllla, A.Hubert, Husveth, Ferenc1 and Dublecz, Karoly2
Address : Department of Agricultural Science, Rivers State College of Education, P.M.B. 5047, Port Harcourt. Rivers State, Nigeria.

Abstract

Experiment was conducted to evaluate the use of corn germ oil sludge (CS) in diets for broiler chickens. CS was compared with beef tallow (BT) and a control diet containing no added fat at dietary levels of 80 g/kg and 40 g/kg for CS and BT, respectively. Diets were formulated to be isonitrogenous (195 g/kg CP) and calculated to be isocaloric (12.4 ± 0.2 Mj/kg). Live weight, feed intake, weight gain, feed conversion ratio and mortality of the chicks was measured. Fatty acid composition of breast muscle tissues was also determined. Chicks fed CS did not differ in weight gain and feed conversion from those fed BT or the control diets. However, the fatty acid profile of breast muscle tissue was altered by diets. In the tissue, n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) concentration and n-6 to n-3 ratio were higher (P<0.05) and saturated fatty acid concentration lower (P0.05) in chicks fed CS than in those fed BT or control diet. Results suggest that CS may be effectively used in broiler diets. The alteration of the tissue fatty acid profile with the feeding of CS diet may be advantageous in the production of PUFA rich broiler chicken meat for health conscious consumers.

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