CHANGES IN THE BLOOD LIPID PROFILE AFTER ADMINISTRATION OF MURRAYA KOENIGII SPRENG (CURRY LEAF) EXTRACTS IN THE NORMAL SPRAGUE DAWLEY RATS

Article Id: ARCC3216 | Page : 223 - 225
Citation :- CHANGES IN THE BLOOD LIPID PROFILE AFTER ADMINISTRATION OF MURRAYA KOENIGII SPRENG (CURRY LEAF) EXTRACTS IN THE NORMAL SPRAGUE DAWLEY RATS.Indian Journal Of Animal Research.2007.(41):223 - 225
M.K. Vinuthan*, V. Girish Kumar*, J.P. Ravindra**, P.S.P. Gupta** and S.J. Arun***
Address : Central Animal House, University of Agricultural Sciences, Bangalore - 560 024, India

Abstract

Aqueous and methanol leaf extract of Murraya koenigii were investigated for hypolipidemic
effects on male Sprague Dawley rats. The rats were divided into three groups of six animals each.
The first group (I) received vehicle alone to serve as control. The second (II) and third (III) groups
received aqueous extract (600 mg/kg b.w.) and methanol extract (200 mg/kg b.w.) respectively
daily orally for a period of eight weeks. There were no significant changes in lipid profile in group
I rats. In groups II and III plasma cholesterol, triglycerides and phospholipids levels were significantly decreased when compared to group I. The decrease in the lipid profile may be due to the constituents present in the leaf which are found to stimulate insulin secretion. The present study therefore suggests that these extracts exert hypolipidemic activities in treated rats

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