EFFECT OF PAPAIN ON TENDERIZATION AND FUNCTIONAL PROPERTIES OF SPENT HEN MEAT CUTS

Article Id: ARCC3176 | Page : 55 - 58
Citation :- EFFECT OF PAPAIN ON TENDERIZATION AND FUNCTIONAL PROPERTIES OF SPENT HEN MEAT CUTS.Indian Journal Of Animal Research.2007.(41):55 - 58
N. Khanna* and P.C. Panda
Address : Department of Livestock Products Technology, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar - 125 004, India

Abstract

Spent hen leg cuts were treated with different concentrations of papain (0, 0.025, 0.05,
0.075 and 0.1 %) at 3 and 5 % levels (w/w) to improve the tenderness of meat. Papain with
0.025 % concentration and at 3 % level produced significantly (P<0.05) more tender meat than
control (0%) group. The above selected concentration and level were tried using both the multiple
injection and the infusion plus forking technique in breast cuts. It was observed that papain at
the above said concentration and level using infusion plus forking technique could significantly
(P005) increase the pH, salt soluble protein, water holding capacity (WHC), emulsifying
capacity and emulsion stability irrespective of cuts with lower values in leg as compared to
breast cuts except the pH which was higher in leg cuts.

Keywords

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