DIFFERENT TRAITS OF BLACK BENGAL GOATS UNDER TWO FEEDING REGIME AND FITTING THE GOMPERTZ CURVE FOR PREDICTION OF WEANING WEIGHT IN THE SEMI-SCAVENGING SYSTEM

Article Id: ARCC184 | Page : 498-503
Citation :- DIFFERENT TRAITS OF BLACK BENGAL GOATS UNDER TWO FEEDING REGIME AND FITTING THE GOMPERTZ CURVE FOR PREDICTION OF WEANING WEIGHT IN THE SEMI-SCAVENGING SYSTEM.Indian Journal Of Animal Research.2013.(47):498-503
Md. Kabirul Islam Khan* and Jannatara Khatun kik1775@yahoo.co.uk
Address : Chittagong Veterinary and Animal Sciences University Khulshi, Chittagong- 4225, Bangladesh

Abstract

This study was aimed to unravel the productive and reproductive performance of Black Bengal goats under two feeding regime and fitting a growth curve function to predict the weaning weight in the semi-intensive system.  The initial and subsequent live weight at bi- weekly intervals for the experimental males and females up to age at sexual maturity and then up to kidding and after kidding up to next conception was recorded. It was observed that the live weight of goats was declined after parturition from the live weight at advanced pregnant stage in both two feeding regimes and dam’s weight was loosening after kidding to 30 days at a rate of 42g/day but then it was increased steadily. Similarly the adult buck was also loosening their weight when they used for serve to the doe. The kids birth weight was varied between sex. In the first few weeks, the kids live weight was increased faster than it was slower up to mature age. The kidding rate and kidding interval for both feeding regime was ranging from 1.50 to 1.62 and 220 to 243 days, respectively. The Gompertz curve function was fitted with the test day basis collected data. It was observed that the Gompertz function parameters were positive and the predicted weaning weight values were higher than the actual values. Significant differences were observed between feeding regime, but not between sexes.

Keywords

Feeding regimes Goats Gompertz curve Traits.

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