STUDIES ON EFFECT OF EMBLICA OFFICINALIS AND VITAMIN E ON BIOCHEMICAL FUNCTIONS IN NORMAL GROWING CALVES.

Article Id: ARCC1244 | Page : 211 - 213
Citation :- STUDIES ON EFFECT OF EMBLICA OFFICINALIS AND VITAMIN E ON BIOCHEMICAL FUNCTIONS IN NORMAL GROWING CALVES..Indian Journal Of Animal Research.2010.(44):211 - 213
Darshika Sahu, H.S. Singh and A. Mishra
Address : College of Veterinary Science & Animal Husbandary, M.P.P.C.V.V., Jabalpur – 482 001, India

Abstract

In the present investigation the efficacy of Emblica officinalis and Vitamin E on some of the
biochemical functions in calves was undertaken. Blood samples of the calves were collected
after birth and thereafter, on 1st, 3rd, 7th, 14th, 21st, 30th, 45th and 60th day. Data revealed that on
day 45th blood glucose level was significantly (p0.05) higher in E. officinalis treated calves thn
in vitamin E and control group. The level of total proteins remained almost identical throughout
the period with significantly higher level (p0.01) at day 60th in E. officinalis treated roup as
compared to vitamin E and control group. A higher (p<0.01) level of albumin was observed in E.
officinalis treated group as compared to vitamin E and control group at day 60th. There was
significant (p0.01) change bserved in globulin level at day 30th in summer season than in
winter season. The fibrinogen was found to be significantly (p<0.01) higher in E. officinalis
treated calves than vitamin E treated and control group calves at day 21st, 30th, 45th and 60th. A
significant (p0.01) declinein prothrombin time was observed due to oral administration of E.
officinalis at 21st, 30th, 45th and 60th day post treatment. There was no alteration in serum
triglycerides level subjected to season as well as upon different treatments during the experiment

Keywords

Antioxidant Herbal medicines Biochemical functions Calves

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