EPIDEMIOLOGY OF BRUCELLOSIS IN OCCUPATIONALLY EXPOSED HUMAN BEINGS

Article Id: ARCC1238 | Page : 188 - 192
Citation :- EPIDEMIOLOGY OF BRUCELLOSIS IN OCCUPATIONALLY EXPOSED HUMAN BEINGS.Indian Journal Of Animal Research.2010.(44):188 - 192
Arvind Kumar*, Ajith Kumar, S. Sadish, C. Latha, , K. Kumar and A. Kumar drarvindlpt@indiatimes.com
Address : Division of Veterinary Public Health College of Veterinary and Animal Science, Pookot, - 673 576, India

Abstract

A serological survey was undertaken to assess the extent of brucellosis in human beings of
Lakhidi district in Kerala. A total of 365 serum samples were examined for the presence of
Brucella agglutins. The sera were screened by Rose Bengal Plate Test (RBPT) and Standard
Tube Agglutination Test (STAT) and the samples, which showed a positive reaction, either by
RBPT or STAT or both, were subjected to Heat Inactivation Test (HIT) and 2-Mercaptoethanol
Test (MET).The human sera revealed 2.74 % seroprevalence for brucellosis by RBPT and 1.74
% by STAT. Only three out of ten showed an agglutination titre positive for brucellosis in HIT
whereas one out of ten were positive in MET. Seroprevalence of brucellosis was recorded only
among farmers (2.78%). Females recorded a relatively higher (3.45%) seroprevalence than males
(2.33%). Human reactors positive for brucellosis were aged above 40 years. None of the sera
collected from patients joint pain and veterinary or paraveterinary staff were positive for the
disease. Of the serological tests, RBPT detected the highest number of samples as positive for
brucellosis followed by STAT, HIT and MET. It was also observed that, of the RBPT and STAT
positive cases, HIT recorded more positivity than MET.

Keywords

Brucella Human being Zoonoses Seroprevalence

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