PERFORMANCE AND CARCASS PROPERTIES OF FINISHER BROILERS FED EXOGENOUS ENZYME SUPPLEMENTED SHEEP MANURE BASED DIETS

Article Id: ARCC1219 | Page : 94 - 99
Citation :- PERFORMANCE AND CARCASS PROPERTIES OF FINISHER BROILERS FED EXOGENOUS ENZYME SUPPLEMENTED SHEEP MANURE BASED DIETS.Indian Journal Of Animal Research.2010.(44):94 - 99
P.N. Onu, and F.N. Madubuike*
Address : Department of Animal Production and Fisheries Management, Ebonyi State University, P.M.B. 053, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State.Nigeria.

Abstract

The effects of exogenous enzymes supplementation of heat-treated sheep manure-based diets
on the performance and carcass properties of broiler finisher chicks was studied using 210 fiveweek
old broiler chicks. Seven experimental broiler finisher diets were formulated such that diet
1 contained 0% heat-treated sheep manure (HSM). Diets 2, 4 and 6 contained 5%, 10% and 15%
HSM without supplementation respectively, while diets 3, 5 and 7 contained 5%, 10% and 15%
HSM supplemented with 100mg of exogenous enzyme (Roxazyme G.) respectively. Results showed
that there was no significant (P > 0.05) difference among the treatment groups in daily feed
intake and daily protein intake. There was also no significant (P > 0.05) difference in the weight
gain of birds fed unsupplemented HSM diets and the control. Enzyme supplementation
significantly (P > 0.05) enhanced the weight gain, protein efficiency and feed conversion ratios
of the birds. Significant (P > 0.05) differences only occurred in the dressed weight, breast muscle,
gizzard and the gastrointestinal tract of the birds at 15% dietary HSM level. There was evidence
of beneficial effect of enzyme of the diets on weight gain and dressed weight of the birds at the
various levels of inclusion of heat-treated sheep manure in the diet

Keywords

Broiler finishers Carcass properties Enzymes supplementation Heat-treated sheepmanure Performance

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