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ASHWAGANDHA (WITHANIA SOMNIFERA DUNAL): WONDER MEDICINAL PLANT

Article Id: ARCC1365 | Page : 292 - 297
Citation :- ASHWAGANDHA (WITHANIA SOMNIFERA DUNAL): WONDER MEDICINAL PLANT.Agricultural Reviews.2010.(31):292 - 297
K.C. Verma
Address : Department of Biochemistry, College of Basic Sciences and Humanities, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar-263 145, India

Abstract

Withania somnifera is a pantropic native medicinal plant growing all over western and central
India. Ashwagandha is characterized by the presence of steroidal lactones (withanolides), alkaloids
and flavonoids. Root contains maximum amount of alkaloids – nicotine, sominine, somniferin,
somniferinine, withanine, withanonine, pseudo-withanine, tropin, withanolides etc. These
compounds show relaxant and antispasmotic effects against several plasmogens on intestine, uterine,
bronchial, tracheal, and blood vascular muscles. Roots of the plant show hypotensive, bradycardic,
antitumor, respiratory stimulant activities and radiosensitizing effects in animals.

Keywords

Ashwagandha Withania somnifera Withanolides.

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